OpenStack for Private Cloud PLM?

June 12, 2014

openstacklogo

The debates about cloud and PLM are in full swing. In my view, Why Cloud? is a wrong question these days. I think, the question "How to cloud…?" comes to the first place. One of the most prominent discussion is about private vs. public cloud. The concern about potential leak of corporate knowledge is a valid concerns. For companies in heavy regulated industries private or hybrid cloud is probably the right solution compared to widely used public clouds from Amazon and other cloud infrastructure vendors.

My attention was caught by ReadWrite article – The Open-Source Cloud Takes A Step Toward Simplicity. OpenStack is fast growing free and open source cloud computing platform primarily deployed as an Infrastructure As A Service (IaaS) solution. It is available under Apache license and currently managed by OpenStack Foundation.

The article speaks about company Mirantis that decided to simplify the deployment of OpenStack. The result is product – OpenStack Express hosted by IBM Softlayer infrastructure. Here is a passage from article that will give you the idea what is that about:

Mirantis hopes to change that with OpenStack Express, an OpenStack-as-a-service offering hosted on IBM’s Softlayer infrastructure. It’s intended to make deploying OpenStack easier and faster, freeing developers to focus on their applications. IBM provides the data center underpinnings, and Mirantis provides the software and 24/7 support for the self-service, on-demand offering, the first of its kind in the OpenStack world.

"What Amazon does for public clouds, we do for private clouds," said Adrian Ionel, CEO of Mirantis. OpenStack Express essentially lets you rent bare-metal servers that don’t get shared with other customers, quickly deploy software, and manage everything via a console.

The idea to have easy deployed IaaS platform for private cloud is interesting. It can become an ideal platform for many manufacturing companies looking for cloud solutions and still having concerns about public cloud. It is also a benefit for for PLM software vendors that will be able to provide their cloud PLM platforms on both private and public cloud with minimum infrastructure changes.

What is my conclusion? Development cost and maintenance is critical factor for every cloud PLM providers. This is one of the reasons many of them are focusing on public cloud only. However, availability of Amazon-like private cloud platform can be a game changer in PLM cloud adoption. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


PLM Private Cloud: Yes, No, Maybe?

February 18, 2014

private-public-cloud

While industry is clearly moving to the cloud, the question about choosing right cloud model is getting more important. In my view, this is kind of thing you cannot ignore any more – I expect every manufacturing company is facing a challenging decision about how to improve their collaboration by bringing new innovative cloud tools and, at the same time, answer on privacy concerns, policies and regulations.

CMSWire article Hybrid Clouds for SharePoint: Great, but Not for Everyone published some interesting perspective on the topic of public and private clouds. Article speaks about the rise of Hybrid Cloud. Here is an interesting passage:

A hybrid model allows the enterprise to still keep their private information on premises, but at the same time provide employees with tools that support the new way of working — with “anytime, anywhere access.” So an enterprise might use Office 365 and SkyDrive Pro (now OneDrive for Business) to support collaboration and team projects, but still manage major systems through a private cloud.

I found referencing Microsoft and SharePoint as a good example to serve manufacturing companies – all of them are using SharePoint (to some degree) and almost all of them using SharePoint asked in the past about how to position SharePoint and PDM/PLM tools. Article is referencing pharmaceutical companies as an example of industry that can find difficult moving everything to public cloud. I’m sure, PLM vendors can find many other examples where regulation and policies will welcome hybrid cloud models.

However, as author stated Hybrid cloud can be costly and it won’t be "for everyone". To maintain IT infrastructure for both on-premise and cloud based environment won’t work for small and medium sized companies. So, hybrid cloud can be a bridge model for many of these companies towards full public cloud deployments.

What is my conclusion? For manufacturing companies it will be all about cost vs. privacy. Many small to medium sized companies can find themselves very comfortable with public cloud solutions. However, those are under regulation and security concerns, will follow hybrid, private cloud route. For PLM vendors it is all about growth and market. Look on your market segment, customers and demands. To support Hybrid cloud PLM require resources. However, as a vendor, you can certainly limit your market growth by not supporting your large customers with hybrid cloud solutions. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


The challenging face of dual PLM clouds

December 28, 2013

plm-dual-public-private-cloud-challenge

Cloud PLM is a not a new word any more. Established vendors and newcomers in PLM world are developing strategies and implementations how to embrace PLM cloud. In my article few months ago, I’ve talking about multiple faces of the cloud – public, private, hybrid, collocation. Jim Brown, well-known PLM analyst and my long time blogging buddies is covering different visions of PLM vendors in his Tech-Clarity blog these days. Two first articles covered Autodesk and Dassault. It is interesting to see a difference. Autodesk vision described by Jim in the following passage:

Autodesk is embracing the Cloud like no other PLM vendor – Autodesk has made big gets on the cloud. They introduced CAD on the cloud (Fusion360), simulation on the cloud (Sim360), and a host of other new “360″ products to join PLM360 on the cloud. As one of my analyst friends tweeted the Autodesk keynotes mentioned “cloud, cloud, cloud, and cloud.”

Opposite to that, Dassault strategy is quite different and focuses on strategic choice of private cloud (even if technically claims no difference between public and private cloud). Here is an interesting passage from Jim’s post outline Dassault vision:

My final comment on DS strategy is about the cloud. Given the SOA architecture behind DS’ solutions one might expect DS to embrace the cloud wholeheartedly. DS execs were clear in pointing out that they support the cloud – but that they believe the on premise cloud is the viable option for companies today. It’s an interesting stance given that they appear to have the technical capabilities required but are choosing to opt away from the public cloud. This is an area to watch.

The question of private and public cloud strategies is important. Even cloud is a new trend, PLM vendors can gather some experience from challenges that non-PLM vendors are experiencing with implementing different cloud strategies. ComputerWorld article Why Microsoft SharePoint Faces a Challenging Future speaks about SharePoint dual strategy to maintain existing SharePoint 2013 on premise version as well as developing new SharePoint Online. The article is worth looking and contains lots of interesting examples. The following passage is my favorite:

Many enterprises use and like SharePoint. Microsoft likes it, too, because it’s one of the company’s fastest-growing product lines. But making enterprises support separate cloud and on-premises versions and telling SharePoint app developers not to work in C# and ASP.NET may make for a rocky relationship as time goes by.

Customization is an important aspect of every enterprise deployment. PLM is not an exclusion. Existing PLM deployments are full of customization made using existing development tools. Even more, on-premise deployments can provide some customization flexibilities that hardly can be achieved in public cloud implementations.

What is my conclusion? Dual cloud strategy sounds very compelling and we can hear about it a lot. However, to achieve real "cloud duality" can be tricky. Another level of complexity is to maintain transparent private/public customization and configuration using existing and new PLM technologies and tools. IT managers, PLM advisers and customers should take a note. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Siemens PLM Analyst Event and PLM Public Cloud Strategies

September 10, 2013

Social tools can make your professional life much more efficient these days. I’ve been following Siemens PLM analyst event in Boston last week via twitter. The even is over, but you can still reach the tail of the information today by searching for #SPLM13 hash tag on twitter. Twitter search tool has a limited timespan, so run fast if you want to get the original tweet stream.

Cloud PLM switch is under go and obviously, one of the topics of my interest was Siemens PLM software in the cloud. Few months ago, Siemens PLM announced about TeamCenter cloud availability and IaaS cloud strategy. I wanted to find some examples of TeamCenter cloud experience provided by customers. Cloud buzzworld wasn’t on the top of hype list for the event. It was very easy to catch the following tweet by Jim Brown:

Jim Brown @jim_techclarity. Sterling – Yes, Teamcenter is on #Cloud. 2 customers up. Working w/ partners vs setting up cloud #SPLM13 #PLM

One of the top differentiations in cloud strategies today is private vs. public cloud. The associate cost is one of the factors of the decision. The cost of data centers and services can easy go high and it will influence other decisions – availability, packages, price. I found a very interesting article speaking about cloud cost differentiations published in Wired magazine. Navigate to the following link to read – Why Some Startups Say the Cloud Is a Waste of Money. Make a read. The main point in the article is that public cloud and Amazon can be quite costly and not efficient in specific cloud configurations. The article brings multiple examples companies started with public cloud on the Amazon and moved towards private cloud within the time. Here is my favorite passage from the article.

“The public cloud is phenomenal if you really need its elasticity,” Frenkiel says. “But if you don’t — if you do a consistent amount of workload — it’s far, far better to go in-house.” Within IT departments, public clouds do tend to get more expensive over time, especially when you reach a certain scale.’

PLM vendors are following different strategies when it comes to public and private cloud these days. Arena Solutions (aka Bom.com in early days) is offering their software as public cloud. The same does Autodesk with PLM360. Dassault Systemes didn’t provide any information about how much cost their new cloud offering. Meantime, Siemens PLM didn’t provide any information about TeamCenter on the cloud as well. Here is the only relevant tweet from #SPLM13 I found about Siemens PLM cloud licensing and cost:

PJ Jakovljevic @pjtec4 #splm13 Interesting that in #SiemensPLM’s new go-to-market initiatives there are no mentions of #cloud & subscription licensing #JustSaying

What is my conclusion? We are getting into period of time PLM vendors will try to innovate by trying different cloud strategies. My hunch there are two main reasons here – cost and market differentiations. Public vs. private cloud will be one of the key differentiators. The elastic capability of public cloud is a huge advantage and it was proven by many internet and enterprise companies. At the same time, specific characteristics of PLM business can make private cloud and combined options attractive as well. The jury is still out. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Will enterprise PLM embrace hybrid cloud?

February 15, 2013

Cloud is trending and we can see more examples of how cloud technologies applies in business. PLM vendors are not standing aside from the cloud. You may see different ways PLM companies are developing their cloud PLM strategies. It starts from public cloud offering coming from Autodesk PLM 360 and Arena and ends up with Siemens PLM Teamcenter leveraging IaaS, Windchill hosted by IBM and Dassault Enovia presenting their solutions as "online system".

What is important is to look on customer realities these days. Let’s face the facts. Almost every manufacturing company these days have a significant amount of enterprise software deployed in house. The larger company you go, you discover more enterprise system managed by company IT. While cloud can be promising opportunity, co-existence of public cloud systems and existing IT can become a problem and impact the speed of cloud deployments and developments. In such context, development of "hybrid clouds" can become an interesting option, in my view.

Earlier today, my attention was caught by Rackspace article – Rackspace Study: The Case for Hybrid cloud. Rackspace is a growing outfit specialized in hosting and cloud infrastructure. Read the article and make your opinion. The following passage explains in a nutshell the idea:

One big trend that has gained considerable momentum with these large organizations is the use of hybrid clouds, which is basically the usage of cloud from an IaaS provider alongside other platforms in order to deliver an application or workload to several users. Hybrid clouds bring a number of different advantages to enterprises, such as the ease of spinning resources up and down , and the cost efficiency of being able to pay for the capacity on an hourly or monthly basis instead of being tied down to a specific billing plan. What’s even better is that it allows for the greatest flexibility when the virtualization technology vendors started offering built in support for moving live virtual machines across a network, as it allows a straightforward means of transitioning applications and workloads between sites.

Take a look on a picture below. Rackspace is building a case for the multi-site hybrid cloud. Here is the explanation provided by Rackspace:

rackspace-hybrid-cloud1.png

Rackspace defines a multi-site hybrid cloud is one that involves attaching existing IT infrastructure to a public cloud provider via a private leased line or a public internet connection. The main advantage to a hybrid cloud is that it allows existing infrastructure, including legacy hardware and code that are otherwise expensive and disruptive to replace. However, this doesn’t come without a catch, as it greatly limits control over geography and may result in increased latency as distance between sites increase, not to mention includes additional time and expense meant for provisioning network connections and reliability of inter-site communication, when compared to pure cloud implementations.

I found this idea interesting. Every IT in a large organization is looking how to optimize cloud deployment without disrupting the existing IT servers rooms. Hybrid cloud can be a good solution for that. Another aspect is security. In my view, hybrid cloud can provide some advantages to IT and large companies to keep some their servers more protected.

What is my conclusion? IT is a blocker to cloud technologies in many companies these days. Even if IT understands the value of the cloud technologies, it provides too much disruption to existing IT infrastructure and future strategies. So, Rackspace is spot on. Hybrid cloud can be a potential way to mitigate a potential concerns of IT about public cloud. Note to companies looking for PLM solutions. While public cloud can provide a clear strategic advantage in terms of resource optimiaztion, Hybrid cloud can be an interesting option and intermediate steps towards exploration of cloud technologies for larger manufacaturing firms. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


PLM Cloud: Dedicated, Private, Public

February 1, 2011

The conversation about cloud is trending these days. Earlier last week, duringSolidWorks World 2011, I had a chance to share my opinion about cloud application development with many people there. SolidWorks was “talking about cloud” a lot during the past year. Last year, I read a nice review of platform shifts and online security from SolidWorks’s co-founder Jon Hirschtick published on SolidWorks blog. Actually, new SolidWorks CEO, Bertrand Sicot, put some clarification behind SolidWorks cloud program during the last event. Despite the fact everybody talks “cloud”, I found a lot of confusion around the cloud topic especially with the notion of different “types of cloud” environment.

Cloud: Server + Network + Virtualization

The best short definition of the “cloud” I’ve heard over the past few weeks was the following one: cloud means “not here”. I found it may be a bit over simplification. I found very meaningful to talk about cloud in terms of servers, network and virtualization. I can see servers is something that remains the same regardless on the notion of company IT as well as the cloud. However, in the case of IT option, servers are located in the company IT data center. Cloud can move these servers out of your company IT data center room. Network is another element that actually bridge between our traditional understanding of IT and cloud. In the past, we operated with terms LAN and WAN. Today the Internet is included into the network scope. However, network remains the same. Another topic is Virtualization. This is not an absolutely new topic, but getting a new notion these days. The ability to make a virtual environment isn’t new and this is not invented by cloud. However, this ability is getting new meaning when multiple virtual environments are able to run on physical servers over the network. Depending on the server location we differentiate between dedicated, private and public clouds.

Dedicated Cloud

This is simple and, in my view, very similar to traditional corporate IT environments. You still have a physical instance of the server. However, the server will be located “not here”. This practically means the outsourcing of physical servers from corporate data centers.

Private Cloud

The next step in “not here” option. In addition to outsourcing servers, you can run multiple virtual environment on top of physical server boxes. You can also have a firewall option. So, this “private cloud” environment will be a bunch of virtual machines running on top of physical server boxes.

Public Cloud

This option is probably the most interesting. Cloud providers (i.e. AWS, Rackspace) can provide virtual servers running on top of “some servers” located “not here”. However, in this case, you won’t be able to control physical boxes. This option can provide a maximum of elastic cloud capabilities. However, it brings a compromise with regards to security options.

No Agreement About The Cloud?

I still cannot see an agreement between different players on the market of cloud computing. On the following video, you can see how Cloud is explained by salesforce.com – the most clean and straightforward definition, in my view.

However, life is not as easy as it presented on salesforce’s video. To prove that, you can join this fascinating video of Larry Allison talking about his perspective on cloud computing.

What is my conclusion? I think we are in the middle of cloud transformation. Still the definition, terminology and lots of other stuff can be modified in the next few years. I’m expecting some marketing buzzes to go away and some practical definitions to get in to clarify what means cloud for the enterprise, in general, and specifically for engineering and manufacturing software. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


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