What stops manufacturing from entering into DaaS bright future?

January 7, 2015

cloud-mfg-daas

There are lot of changes in manufacturing eco-system these days. You probably heard about many of them. Changes are coming as a result of many factors – physical production environment, IP ownership, cloud IT infrastructure, connected products, changes in demand model and mass customization.

The last one is interesting. The time when manufacturing was presented as a long conveyor making identical product is gone. Diversification and local markets have significant impact. Today manufacturing companies are looking how to discover and use variety of data sources to get right demand information, product requirements and connect directly with customers. Data has power and the ability to dig into data becomes very valuable.

As we go through the wave of end of the year blog summaries, my attention caught Design World publication – 7 Most Popular 3D CAD World Blog Posts of 2014 . I found one of them very interesting. Navigate your browser to read – Top Ten Tech Predictions for 2015. One of them speaks about DaaS – Data-as-a-Service will drive new big data supply chain. Here is the passage I captured:

Worldwide spending on big data-related software, hardware, and services will reach $125 billion. Rich media analytics (video, audio, and image) will emerge as an important driver of big data projects, tripling in size. 25% of top IT vendors will offer Data-as-a-Service (DaaS) as cloud platform and analytics vendors offer value-added information from commercial and open data sets. IoT will be the next critical focus for data/analytics services with 30% CAGR over the next five years, and in 2015 we will see a growing numbers of apps and competitors (e.g., Microsoft, Amazon, Baidu ) providing cognitive/machine learning solutions.

The prediction is very exciting. Future data services can help manufacturing companies leverage data to optimize production, measure demand and help manufacturing a diverse set of product for wide range of customers. However, here is a problem. I guess you are familiar with GIGO – Garbage in, Garbage out. When you deal with data, there is nothing more important then to have an access to an accurate and relevant data sets. Big data analytic software can revolutionize everything. But it requires data. At the same time, data is located in corporate databases, spreadsheets, drawings, email systems and many other data sources. To get these data up to the cloud, crunch it using modern big data clouds and make it actionable for decision processes is a big deal.

What is my conclusion? Data availability is a #1 priority to make DaaS work for manufacturing in coming years. The ability to collect right data from variety corporate sources, clean, classify, process and turn into action – this is a big challenge and opportunity for new type of manufacturing software in coming years. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

photo credit: IvanWalsh.com via photopin cc


How PLM can ride big data trend in 2015

December 22, 2014

plm-actionable-data-decision-process

Few month ago, I shared the story of True & co – company actively experimenting and leveraging data science to improve design and customer experience. You can catch up by navigating on the following link – PLM and Big Data Driven Product Design. One of the most interesting pieces of True & Co experience I’ve learned was the ability to gather a massive amount of data about their customers and turn in into a information to improve product design process.

Earlie this week the article What’s next for big data prediction for 2015 caught my attention. I know… it is end of the year “prediction madness”. Nevertheless, I found the following passage interesting. It speaks about emerging trend of Information as a service. Read this.

The popularity of “as-a-Service” delivery models is only going to increase in the years ahead. On the heels of the success of software as a service models, I believe Information-as-a-Service (IaaS) or Expertise-as-a-Service delivery models are likely the next step in the evolution. The tutoring industry provides a good blueprint for how this might look. Unlike traditional IT contractors, tutors are not necessarily hired to accomplish any one specific task, but are instead paid for short periods of time to share expertise and information.

Now imagine a similar model within the context of data analytics. The shortfall most often discussed with regard to analytics is not in tooling but in expertise. In that sense, it’s not hard to imagine a world where companies express an interest in “renting” expertise from vendors. It could be in the form of human expertise, but it could also be in the form of algorithmic expertise, whereby analytics vendors develop delivery models through which companies rent algorithms for use and application within in their own applications. Regardless of what form it takes in terms of its actual delivery, the notion of information or expertise as a service is an inevitability, and 2015 might just be the year IT vendors start to embrace it.

It made me think about how PLM can shift a role from being only “documenting and managing data and processes” towards providing services to improve it by capturing and crunching large amount of data in organization. Let speak about product configurations – one of the most complicated element of engineering and manufacturing. Mass production model is a think in a past. We are moving towards mass customization. How manufacturing companies will be able to get down cost of products and keep up with a demand for mass customization? Intelligent PLM analytics as a service will be able to help here.

What is my conclusion? Data is a new oil. Whoever will have an access to a most accurate data will have a power to optimize processes, cut cost and deliver product faster. PLM companies should take a note and think how to move from “documenting” data about design and processes towards analytical application and actionable data. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Future of design: how to connect physical and digital entities?

December 3, 2014

connect-physical-digital

Technology can help us to expand horizons of possible and impossible. I’ve been experiencing this expansion earlier today while watching AU2014 keynote session online while physically traveling to Denver, CO. Twitter and streaming video are quite efficient way to stay in touch with event virtually everywhere. If you missed AU live streaming earlier today, you can catch up on it in recording here.

Autodesk’s CEO Carl Bass was talking about changes computers bring in our lives and how it impacts engineers. He spoke about interaction between physical and digital worlds. Scott Sheppard summarized key points of Carl Bass speech here. I specially liked the following passage:

Computers and software are great tools, but only if the data they are computing is in the right form. When they know what to do, computers can do awesome things, but they are almost useless when we have problems we can’t communicate in terms they understand. Technology is the driving force behind the biggest changes in the future of how we design, engineer, and make things. There are two fundamental shifts in play: (1) The first is narrowing the gap between the physical and digital world — essentially what’s on the two sides of the screen; (2) The second big change is getting the computer to understand the relationships and interactions of the people and companies doing the work.In each case, our ability to represent the problem in the computer determines how well we can use the computer to solve it.

One of the key things I captured is related to understanding of relationships between physical and digital assets. This is where things are getting really interesting. This is also something that connected me to Jeff Kowalski’s story about design for live objects.

It made me think about how future design can be connected to real information we are capturing today online. Google is ahead of many other companies in building online knowledge base about the world we live in. It comes in variety of digital forms – maps, traffic, information about physical entities and many others. If I will try to connect Jeff’s example with self made bridge, I guess information about this bridge, city and traffic is already available on Google in different forms. So, how future design companies will create technologies with information that can be intertwined between digital and physical entities?

Google Knowledge Graph is one of the technological elements to represent a diverse set of information about physical and digital entities. I’ve been writing about it before. A new article caught my attention few weeks ago – Insightful Connections Between Entities on Google’s Knowledge Graph. Read the article and draw your conclusion. Here is the most interesting passage speaking about data connections:

The node in a data graph may represent an entity, such as a people, places, items, ideas, topics, abstract concepts, concrete elements, other things, or combinations of things. These entities in the graph may be related to each other by edges which connect them. Those may represent relationships between entities. For example, the data graph may have an entity that corresponds to the actor Tom Hanks and the data graph may also contain information about other entities such as movies that Tom Hanks and others have acted in.

google-data-graph-nodes-edges

Google Knowledge graph is not the only way to embrace connection in digital world. Facebook, LinkedIn and other web companies are focusing on building of information graphs about digital assets and physical entities. I’ve been touching it in my semantic enterprise graph post. Together with design and engineering information it can provide a view of future physical and digital universe.

What is my conclusion? The border between digital and physical entities is getting blurred. According to Carl Bass, in the future we will capture physical entities and re-use it for design of new products. We will capture experience of live object and build models to make analysis and improve them. It will require deep understanding and management of connections and relations to create a giant model of future hybrid universe of physical and digital world. Just my thoughts and thanks Autodesk for inspiration.

Best, Oleg

Disclaimer: I’m Autodesk employee. However, the views and opinions expressed in this blog are my own only and in no way represent the views, positions or opinions – expressed or implied – of my employer.


PLM and Big Data Driven Product Design

September 25, 2014

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One of the most interesting trends to watch these days is big data. It started few years ago and I can see different dynamics related to usage and value proposition of big data. It certainly started as a technology that revolutionized the way we can capture and process large amount of data. This is where everybody get into Hadoop. However, to have a possibility to process data is just a beginning. What and how can we get value of this data? How can we efficiently use this data for decision processes? These are the most important questions on the table of data scientists, data architects, IT managers and software vendors.

I touched big data topics on my blog several time before. In one of my earlier posts – Will PLM vendors dig into Big Data? two years ago, I discussed big data opportunity and adoption rate in different industries. However, in many situations, I’ve seen vendors are approaching big data in a too wide and abstract way. It sounds like “just collect data and see the magic”. Take a look on my writeup for more details – Why PLM cannot adopt Big Data now?

I’ve been tying to come with more specific examples of how companies can use data. My attention caught by smart data collective article – Data Driven Lingerie few days ago. It speaks about company True&Co, which is focusing on design and e-commerce lingerie based on absolutely incredible data driven approach. Here is a short passage from article, which explains that:

True & co is an interesting company that combines data and design to create an opportunity for consumers to share data with the company, thereby improving the appropriateness of the product to the customer. True & co claims to be the first company to fit women into their favourite bra with a fit quiz – no fitting rooms, no measuring tape, no photos. The data they collect allows them to match the customer to over 6000 body types on their database.

I recommend you to spend 12 minutes of your time and watch True&Co CEO Michelle Lam speaks about data driven product experience.

I found very interesting to see how True&C use data not only to empower e-commerce experience, but actually design products with a specific requirements. It is fascinating example of how specific data collected from millions of customers can be used to classify product requirements, distinguish product configurations and optimize supply chain.

trueco-product-data-driven-design

Product configuration is a very complex field. Traditional PLM implementations typically demonstrating aerospace and automotive industries to describe the complexity of configurations. It is unusual and interesting to see 6000 product configurations of bras tailored to specific customer requirements. This is a very unique experience and good example of specific big data applications.

What is my conclusion? With growing interest in product customization, we are going to see requirements to manage product configurations everywhere. Sometimes it is driven by personalization and sometimes it is driven by diverse set of customer requirements. The example of True&Co is maybe unique these days. However, I think, the trend is towards empower designers and manufacturing companies with data insight to develop better product. Big data can help companies to create a unique product experience, to design better products and optimize resources. This is a future as I can see today. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


How to visualize future PLM data?

August 12, 2014

collective experience of empathetic data systems

I have a special passion for data and data visualization. We do it every day in our life. Simple data, complex data, fast data, contextual data… These days, we are surrounded by data as never before. Think about typical engineer 50-60 years ago. Blueprints, some physical models… Not much information. Nowadays the situation is completely different. Multiple design and engineering data, historical data about product use, history of design revisions, social information, data about how product is performing coming in real time from sensors, etc. Our ability to discover and use data becomes very important.

The ways we present data for decision making can influence a lot and change our ability to design in context of right data. To present data for engineers and designers these days can become as important as presenting right information to airplane pilots before. Five years ago, I posted about Visual Search Engines on 3D perspective blog. I found the article is still alive. Navigate your browser here to have a read. What I liked in the idea of visual search is to present information in the way people can easy understand.

Few days ago, my attention was caught by TechCrunch article about Collective Experience of Empathetic Data Systems (CEEDS) project developed in Europe.

[The project ]… involves a consortium of 16 different research partners across nine European countries: Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and the UK. The “immersive multi-modal environment” where the data sets are displayed, as pictured above — called an eXperience Induction Machine (XIM) — is located at Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona.

Read the article, watch video and draw your conclusion. It made me think about the potential of data visualization for design. Here is my favorite passage from the article explaining the approach:

“We are integrating virtual reality and mixed reality platforms to allow us to screen information in an immersive way. We also have systems to help us extract information from these platforms. We use tracking systems to understand how a person moves within a given space. We also have various physiological sensors (heart rate, breathing etc.) that capture signals produced by the user – both conscious and subconscious. Our main challenge is how to integrate all this information coherently.”

Here is the thing. The challenge is how to integrated all the information coherently. Different data can be presented differently – 3D geometry, 2D schema, 2D drawings, graphics, tables, graphs, lists. In many situations we can get this information presented separately using different design and visualization tools. However, the efficiency is questionable. Many data can be lost during visualization. However, what I learned from CEEDS project materials, data can be also lost during the process of understanding. Blindspotting. Our brain will miss the data even we (think) that we present it in a best way.

What is my conclusion? Visualization of data for better understanding will play an increased role in the future. We just in the beginning of the process of data collection. We understand the power of data and therefore collect an increased amount of data every day. However, to process of data and visualizing for better design can be an interesting topic to work for coming years. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Who will make PLM sexier?

July 24, 2014

sexier-plm

Cool factor is trending in software these days. The time when software was ugly is probably in the past. Everyone wants to have a "cool app" – on the picture above you can clearly see the trend. Does it apply to enterprise software and PLM? It is a good question. Back in 2012, I asked it in my post – PLM: Ugly vs. Cool. While nobody specifically focused on how to develop cool PLM software, I can see an increased interest for improved user experience from PLM vendors.

cool-sexy-app-trend

UX magazine article Is there Room for Sexy in Enterprise Design? caught my attention few days ago. I found the discussion about emotional factor interesting and important. I especially liked the following passage:

The question enterprise technology companies need to ask themselves is “what does sexy mean to your enterprise customer?” Put another way, how do your customers want to feel when using your products?Every product, whether we realize it or not, produces an emotional reaction. As Donald Norman articulated in his seminal book Emotional Design, customers find aesthetically pleasing products more effective. Customers even “love” these products. Norman identified the commercial value in evoking some passion towards products, such as Gucci bags and Rolex watches. MailChimp’s Director of User Experince, Aarron Walter, took this one step further with his book, Designing for Emotion. He posits that the goal of emotional design is to connect with users and evoke positive emotions, which will make your users want to continue interacting with your product.

Article speaks about EchoUser research of emotions with enterprise customers. The following emotions are make sense to enterprise crowd – powerful, trust, flexible, calm, pride, accomplished. Cool and sexy are not in the list. So, is there a place for "cool and sexy" in PLM? For long time PLM was associated with "complex" and "expensive". At the same time, most of PLM commercial videos are cool and sexy. Sport cars, luxury airplanes, fashion shows, mobile devices. You rarely can see PLM video without such type of product examples.

I think, many PLM professionals these days are still trying to keep the association of PLM with complexity. My hunch, they are trying to justify expenses. Customers might think complex solution requires more budget, longer consultancy and service project. However, the other side of complexity is to feel absence of reliability and trust. This is not a simple decision for PLM consultants and software vendors.

What is my conclusion? People don’t like cumbersome software these days. There is no place for complex user experience even in enterprise software. What emotions should drive CAD and PLM software? How engineers should feel about software? I’d like to connect the results of engineering and manufacturing process with PLM tools. You cannot make good products with wrong tools. So, something should happen with PLM software. Complex PLM software is a wrong tool to build future cool products. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

photo credit MidoriShoes


Drawing Callouts and Future Google PLM Design

June 27, 2014

google-material-design

For me, Google is one of the symbols of simple software design. Therefore, Google developers event is always a good place to get inspired with ideas and new technologies. Google I/O was this week in San Francisco. I had now chance to attend the event, but was able to watch video streaming of keynote and few other sessions. One of the things Google introduced this year was Material Design – a new approach to rethink user experience to make it more natural, consistent and clean. Watch the following video to learn more.

Material design presentation made me think again about how to develop simple PLM experience. The topic isn’t new. I’ve been talking about it already for few years. Remember my presentation almost 3 years ago at AU 2011?

future-plm-ux

The time of complex and cumbersome enterprise user experience is finally over. Simplicity is an obsessive motto of every enterprise software company these days. However, to develop good UX is a big deal. It requires time and effort. “Don’t make me think” is my favorite quote by Steve Krug about how to develop good UI. How to do so? This is a tricky question. In my view, one of the key elements of this process is to capture elements of well known customer behaviors. You need to learn how people work today. It is extremely hard to change existing user behaviors.

I’ve been reading GrabCAD blog post -BOM Find Numbers: Don’t Get Too Attached. Read the article – it is short and sweet. I’m sure you are familiar with “drawing callout” and find numbers. It was absolutely must feature on paper drawing. Should we keep them in the future? This is a question Ed Lopategui is asking in his post? His conclusion – not really. Here is a passage explaining that:

Find numbers will make little sense in the future, so it’s probably best for everyone if you don’t get too attached to them. There will come a day where the find number is finally retired, and we can move on to the next chapter of BOM management. How can you get to that future faster, you might ask? That’s the easy part: move away from all those outdated BOM authoring tools (like Excel for one), and adopt a modern, integrated BOM editing capability.

bom-find-numbers

I liked BOM find numbers example. New technologies can clearly help us to interlink between BOM and 3D models. It is good to shift away from managing Bill of Materials in Excel spreadsheets. At the same time, maybe we need to think twice and not to kill familiar user behavior and experience? Maybe we can re-use it for the future clean user interface design. Users are familiar with existing experience and it can help them to understand how to use the system.

What is my conclusion? Existing engineering behaviors have long history going back to drawing boards, paper drawing and engineers collaborating live in one room. Digital technologies are ripping off these behaviors. We create digital models and collaborate using internet and computer screens. New ideas and technologies are good. At the same time, it is might be a good idea to learn from existing behaviors and preserve some of them in the way that will simplify digital collaboration and design. It will definition good for user adoption. What to keep and how to combine existing behaviors and technologies? This is a very good question. I’m sure it will inspire PLM innovators for coming years. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


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