OpenStack for Private Cloud PLM?

June 12, 2014

openstacklogo

The debates about cloud and PLM are in full swing. In my view, Why Cloud? is a wrong question these days. I think, the question "How to cloud…?" comes to the first place. One of the most prominent discussion is about private vs. public cloud. The concern about potential leak of corporate knowledge is a valid concerns. For companies in heavy regulated industries private or hybrid cloud is probably the right solution compared to widely used public clouds from Amazon and other cloud infrastructure vendors.

My attention was caught by ReadWrite article – The Open-Source Cloud Takes A Step Toward Simplicity. OpenStack is fast growing free and open source cloud computing platform primarily deployed as an Infrastructure As A Service (IaaS) solution. It is available under Apache license and currently managed by OpenStack Foundation.

The article speaks about company Mirantis that decided to simplify the deployment of OpenStack. The result is product – OpenStack Express hosted by IBM Softlayer infrastructure. Here is a passage from article that will give you the idea what is that about:

Mirantis hopes to change that with OpenStack Express, an OpenStack-as-a-service offering hosted on IBM’s Softlayer infrastructure. It’s intended to make deploying OpenStack easier and faster, freeing developers to focus on their applications. IBM provides the data center underpinnings, and Mirantis provides the software and 24/7 support for the self-service, on-demand offering, the first of its kind in the OpenStack world.

"What Amazon does for public clouds, we do for private clouds," said Adrian Ionel, CEO of Mirantis. OpenStack Express essentially lets you rent bare-metal servers that don’t get shared with other customers, quickly deploy software, and manage everything via a console.

The idea to have easy deployed IaaS platform for private cloud is interesting. It can become an ideal platform for many manufacturing companies looking for cloud solutions and still having concerns about public cloud. It is also a benefit for for PLM software vendors that will be able to provide their cloud PLM platforms on both private and public cloud with minimum infrastructure changes.

What is my conclusion? Development cost and maintenance is critical factor for every cloud PLM providers. This is one of the reasons many of them are focusing on public cloud only. However, availability of Amazon-like private cloud platform can be a game changer in PLM cloud adoption. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


PDM/PLM. Why The Cloud? Wrong question…

June 6, 2014

how-to-do-plm-on-the-cloud

You may think engineers like everything new. You may think it is so obvious. Engineers are developing all new technologies, gadgets and machines. All this new stuff… Literally everything… was actually developed by engineers. Engineers are in love from everything new they develop.

But, here is the problem. When it comes to the point of deciding about technology and software engineers use by themselves to develop products, it turns opposite. Engineers is probably one of the most conservative group of people to adopt new tech. It may take months to manufacturing company to decide about usage of enterprise software. When it comes to PDM/PLM system, the evaluation can take even longer…

I’ve been reading Manufacturing Business Technology Magazine article – Why The Cloud? Navigate here to read the article. It speaks about benefits of cloud technologies such as low license cost, fast deployment and ease of data sharing. It makes some points of advantages of cloud PLM tools. The last one is the most interesting, since it emphasize the ability to turn manufacturing and supply chain into connected eco-system. Here is my favorite passage:

As engineering and manufacturing data moves to the cloud, mid-sized manufacturers are finding that they can easily and automatically pull component and engineering data into their designs, transparently move those designs between different tools to ensure performance and manufacturability, and securely and directly publish data to suppliers worldwide for prototyping and production. Manufacturing data in the cloud is nimble: It can be connected into a larger ecosystem of cloud services and moved where you need it, when you need it.

This article made me think that the question "Why The Cloud?" is a little bit… outdated. I will try to explain what does it mean for me. For the last 3-4 years, we’ve seen a massive shift of IT into the cloud. It is clear to every CIO and IT manager these days that they can benefit from the cloud. All PLM vendors are developing cloud strategies and provide a way to deploy their software in the cloud in some ways. However, this is exactly the place that requires validation. Not "why the cloud?". This is wrong question. The right one is – how to implement the cloud? I can see 3 main groups of cloud PDM/PLM tools applicable for engineers and manufacturers

Mainstream cloud tools

IT people can disagree with me. I can see people every day are using consumer and other mainstream cloud tools for business. If your Exchange cannot handle large emails, Gmail most probably does. You can share CAD and Excel files via Dropbox, Google Drive, iCloud, OneDrive and others. Most of these tools are free or very cheap and it is very hard to prevent people from using them.

IaaS based PDM/PLM tools

Many PDM/PLM vendors are choosing IaaS as a cloud strategy. I’ve been posted about it here. Nothing wrong with that. By leveraging elastic computing power and virtual servers, you can get PLM system deployed on private and/or public cloud. For most of cases, these we are talking about PLM solutions adopted to cloud IaaS infrastructure. While vendors can create a different licensing schema and get all advantages of cloud infrastructure, for most of the cases, these tools are still replicated the same "PDM/PLM story". The main difference – your server is on the cloud now. And some of your servers can be shared between multiple customers, so you can get cost advantage of shared resources, deployments and updates.

Specialized "born in the cloud" (PDM/PLM) tools

The main difference of these tools is that they were natively developed for the cloud. Tools in this category leverage not only computing infrastructure, but also social, functional and business aspects of cloud eco-system. Most of them are implementing the ability to support social interaction and communication. Also, these tools are focusing how to share information beyond the point of single organization.

What is my conclusion? The period of early adoption of cloud technologies is over. It is clear – cloud is going to stay with us. However, the question how to leverage cloud technologies and turn it into best products expanding customer ability to design and manufacturing best products is still in front of us. It is going to be a massive shift towards different approach in the way cloud will helps to build new products. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Cloud PDM and Dropbox Streaming Sync

May 30, 2014

cloud-CAD-PDM-dropbox-sync

Few days ago, I captured the idea of building cloud PDM system on top of Dropbox infrastructure. It is hard to me to say if manufacturing companies will be ready to put CAD data into Dropbox servers. At the same time, Dropbox infrastructure is starting to make even more sense for management of CAD files on the cloud. Here is an interesting piece. My attention caught the following LifeHacker article – Enable Dropbox Streaming Sync for Faster File Synchronization. Read this article. It is short and sweet. Dropbox made another optimization of the infrastructure to synchronize files. The following passage explains the idea:

When you upload a file to Dropbox, it’s first sent in its entirety to Dropbox’s servers and then it’s downloaded to any synced computers. In a new, experimental version of Dropbox, however, you can enable streaming sync that starts downloading on the target computer while you upload.

The new desktop client (version 2.9) allows users to download files as they’re being uploaded to Dropbox. Only the downloading machine needs to be updated to 2.9, so using the experimental client should speed up downloads for shared folders as well as from your other devices, regardless of whether anyone else upgrades.

It made me think about interesting and typical scenario that happens in many engineering teams. Think about small group of engineers doing some work together and using any existing CAD desktop software (Autodesk Inventor, AutoCAD, SolidEdge, SolidWorks, etc.) In case they work in one organization, they can easy put all their files on so called "Z-drive" shared in the company. However, what happens if they work in a distributed way (Starbucks coffee shops, home, separate offices, etc.). To buy a traditional PDM system will be too complex and expensive. New Dropbox feature will allow to optimize large CAD file synchronization between their desktop systems and rest of data in the company. Quick and dirty. But it works.

What is my conclusion? There is a tremendous value to use specialized CAD sharing and management systems. I covered these values in my article here. However, when it comes to ease of use, simplicity and very low cost, Dropbox can be a good alternative. For years, Microsoft Excel was (and still is) an alternative PDM/ PLM solution to manage data. Dropbox is coming to the same spot. CAD/PDM companies need to pay attention and take note about how to leverage technologies and ideas developed by engineers from Dropbox. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


PLM users won’t move to the cloud because of cost

May 13, 2014

cloud-adoption-erp-plm

ERP is a long time PLM rival for dominance in manufacturing enterprise organizations. I’m sure you are familiar with the the following discussion topics – what are roles of ERP and PLM in product development process, BOM ownership, enterprise data management, visibility to CIO, etc.

However, here is a new one – cloud. It looks like PLM and ERP will be competing on the speed of cloud adoption. Surprised? Navigate to the following link to read Cloud ERP replacement doubled last year to 24% – Forrester article by Diginomica. Article references Forester research Application Adoption Trends: The Rise Of SaaS speaking about sudden raise of cloud (SaaS) adoption.

Here is my favorite passage from the Diginomica post:

In The Rise Of SaaS, author Paul Hamerman, vice president and principal analyst for application development and delivery, states that cost has become secondary to agility and speed as a motive for SaaS adoption. The top drivers cited by respondents included business agility, speed of implementation and faster delivery of new functionality. He recommends his readers prepare for a number of changes in the way they support business applications, including a shift in perceptions of what counts as legacy:

The new legacy systems are licensed, premises-based applications that are typically customized and difficult to upgrade. As better and better SaaS options become available, look to replace these systems with more flexible and sustainable SaaS solutions.

The key message – it is not about cost, but about agility and speed of cloud solution adoption by enterprise organizations. It reminded me my 2 years old article – Will ERP be on the cloud ahead of PLM? PLM vendors are coming to the cloud and it looks like almost every PLM vendor today has their "own version of cloud PLM". However, can PLM vendors expect a hockey stick in the level of cloud PLM adoption? This is a good question to ask these days.

It seems like PLM vendors got the first part of SaaS – how to cut IT, installation and update cost. This is where newcomers and existing PDM/PLM vendors are clearly shining these days. However, there is a second part – how to make organization to adopt PLM development processes supported by cloud PLM faster? This is a place where cloud PLM is not very much different from "before cloud" PLM, in my view. This process is still long, requires lots of communication with customer including services and deployment. It is business transformation that usually takes so long and requires too many resources and time.

What is my conclusion? Money is not an issue for business. Time is the issue. What I can hear all the time – manufacturing companies have no problem to pay for PLM solutions. The problem is in the way PLM solutions are implemented, speed of business transformation and solution adoption. This is a place where PLM vendors should look for future cloud PLM hockey-stick moment. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

pic credit to Diginomica


PLM Cloud Customization and Online Code Editors

May 8, 2014

cloud-code-plm

One size doesn’t fit all. It very true especially when it comes down to PLM implementations. Once released as a toolkit, PDM / PLM systems did a long way from a system that requires special software compilation to be done for every customers to the current system with flexible data models and tools allowing to configure and customize almost everything. Flexibility (in data model and code) is one of the most demanded characteristics of modern PLM systems.

Customization is also special territory in PLM business. It brings complexity and requires special attention. PLM vendors spent lots of effort to reduce the amount customization required for PLM deployments. However, after all, every PLM implementation requires services. Part of these services is related to customer requests to develop special functionality.

Cloud brings some advantages and complexity to PLM customization-ability. Specific aspects of cloud technology and customization can be different for public and private cloud deployment. Multi-tenant architecture can apply some additional level of complexity. One of the aspects of complexity can be usage of development tools on the cloud.

TechCrunch Disrupt NY presentation by Codeanywhere caught my attention. Navigate your browser to read more Codeanywhere, The Google Docs For Developers, Rocks Startup Alley At Disrupt NY. The idea of Codeanywhere to serve as universal coding environment available on any device is compelling. Look here for more features. I specially liked the ability to manage and store code in different repositories. You can connect to your favorite 3rd party services like Dropbox, Github, Google Drive as well as move files and folders between services.

codeanywhereeditor_large

I have to say that Codeanywhere is not the only provider of coding environment in the cloud. Navigate here to see more tools available. My attention caught service called Runnable. Note, the broad support of languages and tools – C++, Java, Rails, Node.js, JQuery, PHP and more.

runnable-editor-options

Cloud code environments made me think about the opportunity integration (or even embedding) of such type of development environment into cloud PLM platforms. It can provide unmatchable capability to customize PLM systems regardless on location from both sides (customer and developer). The result – low development cost, flexibility to chose the location of service providers and lower customization expenses for customers.

What is my conclusion? Cloud puts some constraints on PLM system customization. To choose special and effective tools can be a game changer for efficient customization. Risk of broad errors and complex multi-tenant constraints raises the need to create a special customization environment. At the same time, cloud is an excellent opportunity to lower the cost of PLM customization by optimizing the overall customization process and, as a result of that, lower expenses. PLM service providers can work from remote locations as well as have much simpler way to re-use customization. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

pic credit – codeanywhere.com and runnable


Dropbox Harmony will knockdown PLM collaboration

May 1, 2014

File sync and sharing became the most requested feature to enable collaboration. The days when everybody were co-located in the same office and working from desktop computer are gone. According to Forrester review file sync and sharing can bring real business value. One the picture below you can see what are the most typical tasks for users related to file sync and share.

file-sync-share-tasks-forrester

Few days ago, I was reading ReadWrite article about Dropbox "Harmony Project". In a nutshell Dropbox allows to work virtually on the same files, while physically files are synced and distributed across the network via Dropbox. The following quote is important.

Document sharing can still be a painful process, and Project Harmony appears to have some handy features for sidestepping the back-and-forth with emailed documents many people experience in business settings. When Dropbox files sync, a little green check mark appears to let users know everything is uploaded; with Project Harmony, that little checkbox takes center stage.

When a user opens a PowerPoint presentation in Project Harmony, for example, that green check mark lives on the right side of the window. When a collaborator joins that presentation, a plus one (+1) appears. This lets everyone know there is more than one person working on a document, and all involved can use an instant messaging tool right inside the document.

The following picture presents chat window that allows to two people to collaborate on the same document.

dropbox-chat-doc

The source of the picture in the following Dropbox blog article. The new functionality is coming as part of Dropbox for business. While it is clear that main Dropbox goal is to compete with Google Apps/Drive and Microsoft OneDrive and new Office apps, it may provide some benefits to people looking today for PLM software.

PLM is not only about complex 3D models of aircraft and automobile. It is about zillions of other documents – requirements, bill of materials, spec sheets, visualizations, product presentations, etc. These documents are part of the everyday activities in manufacturing companies and engineering organizations. Today, Microsoft Office files and pdf documents are representing a majority of these documents. Excel is clearly a king here. To be able to share bill of materials in Excel via Dropbox and work on this with my supply chain partner, can be an easy option. Yes, it is not fully functioning BOM tool, but to have 80% of functions for near zero price is very cool.

Thinking more about it, I can see some opportunity to use the same technological approach to bring CAD collaboration to the cloud. It will be a bit more tricky to intercept CAD desktop tools to synchronize activities between two desktops, but it is not impossible tech task. While CAD companies are not running fast forward with pure CAD in browser tools, it can be a good technological path to implement collaboration between engineers and re-use Dropbox (or alternative horizontal storage) for files.

What is my conclusion? File sync and share is must have tool to improve the collaboration. The ability to see the same document when working with other people provides huge value and as Google Doc user I can confirm that. To provide an easy path to Excel and maybe desktop CAD users to collaborate via Dropbox for the price of storage can be an interesting tech approach and interesting business opportunity. CAD and PLM collaboration tool will see an additional competitive pressure coming from Dropbox tools. It is a time to think about unique CAD/PLM collaboration features to compete with Dropbox economy of scale. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Will PLM Vendors Jump into Microsoft Cloud Window in Europe?

April 11, 2014

european-plm-cloud

Cloud is raising lots of controversy in Europe. While manufacturing companies in U.S. are generally more open towards new tech, European rivals are much more conservative. Many of my industry colleagues in Germany, France, Switzerland and other EU countries probably can confirm that. Europe is coming to cloud systems, but much slower. I’ve been posting about cloud implications and constraints in Europe. Catch up on my thoughts here – Will Europe adopt cloud PLM? and here PLM cloud and European data protection reforms. These are main cloud concerns raised by European customers – data, privacy and specific country regulation. With companies located in different places in EU, it can be a challenge.

Earlier today, I’ve heard some good news about cloud proliferation in Europe coming from Microsoft. TechCrunch article – Microsoft’s Enterprise Cloud Services Get A Privacy Thumbs Up From Europe’s Data Protection Authorities speaks about the fact Microsoft enterprise cloud service meets the standards of data privacy in several European countries. Here is a passage that can put some lights on details and what does it mean:

But today comes a piece of good news for Redmond: the data protection authorities (DPAs) of all 28 European member states have decided that Microsoft’s enterprise cloud services meet its standards for privacy. This makes Microsoft Azure, Office 365, Microsoft Dynamics CRM and Windows Intune the first services to get such approval. The privacy decision was made by the “Article 29 Data Protection Working Party,” which notes that this will mean that Microsoft will not have to seek approval of individual DPAs on enterprise cloud contracts. In its letter to Microsoft (embedded below), chair Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin writes, “The MS Agreement, as it will be modified by Microsoft, will be in line with Standard Contractual Clause 2010/87/EU… In practice, this will reduce the number of national authorizations required to allow the international transfer of data (depending on the national legislation).”

Majority of PDM / PLM providers are friendly with Microsoft tech stack. Some of them are completely relies on MS SQL server and other Microsoft technologies. Most of them are supporting SharePoint. Now, these PLM vendors have an additional incentive to stay with Microsoft technologies for the cloud. It can be also a good news for manufacturing companies already deployed PDM/PLM solutions on top of Microsoft technologies and developed custom solutions.

What is my conclusion? The technological landscape these days is very dynamic. The time, one platform worked for everybody is over. In light of technological disruption and future challenges tech giants will be using different strategies in order to stay relevant for customers. Will European cloud regulation keep PDM/PLM players with MS Azure and other Microsoft technologies compared to alternative cloud technological stacks? How fast will take to other players to reach the same level of compliance? These are good questions to ask vendors and service providers. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Why so hard to break PLM into components?

April 9, 2014

plm-componentizing

Product Lifecycle Management is not a software. It is business strategy and approach. One of my blog readers mentioned that in the discussion few days ago. Nevertheless, manufacturing companies are usually talking about PLM systems and platforms as something solid and unbreakable. The same picture you can see when looking on PLM online marketing materials and brochures. Despite recent changes in broad PLM acceptance and value proposition, companies still see PLM as a software mostly for engineering domain or driven by engineering IT. One of the dreams many PLM vendors developed for the last decade is how to reach the C-level management such as CIO and engineering executives. In other words, how to reach ERP level of acceptance and awareness.

Earlier today, my attention was caught by Toolbox.com article about modern ERP trends. Navigate to read ERP Trends: Shifting from Big ERP Systems to Componentized ERP Environments. Cloud is changing the face of ERP. The technology is breaking ERP into pieces. One of the results – two tiers ERP configuration. Here is the explanation I captured from the article.

Because of the coinciding innovations in cloud technology, instead of deploying and implementing traditional ERP infrastructure, organizations started adopting a two-tier, or hybrid, ERP model. Two-tier ERP is a method of integrating multiple ERP systems simultaneously. For instance, an organization may run a legacy ERP system at the corporate level while running a separate ERP system or systems, such as cloud ERP, at a subsidiary or division level for back-office processes that have different requirements. To facilitate the adoption of the two-tier methodology, vendors increasingly opened core databases and application programming interfaces and provided customization tools, thus spurring the advent of self-contained, functional ERP components or modules.

So, what does it mean for existing and future PLM strategies and products. More specifically, it made me think about the possibility to break large and heavy PLM platforms into sets of re-usable components. ERP componentizing example speaks about splitting ERP system into modules such as – supply chain, financial, management, human resources. So what potential PLM split can look like? I can see two possible ways here – business process and lifecycle. The first one is something probably we can see a lot in existing PLM platforms. Requirement management, Design Collaboration, Change Management, NPI, etc. I’ve been thinking about Lifecycle as an alternative approach to the traditional business process oriented approach. Lifeycle approach means to develop applications to serve people with their everyday tasks based on maturity of product in the development or services. Think about manufacturing assembly line. Different tools and operations are applied to manufacturing product to bring it to life. Now think about PLM and software tools. PLM components will be used to create product (actually product data and related information).

Toolbox article also speaks about difficulties of componentized approach. The main one is a potential growth of TCO because of the need to integrated data coming from different modules. Here is the passage I specially liked:

The data from the second-tier cloud ERP or modules typically require normalization to integrate with the legacy ERP system at the corporate level. Although direct cost is associated with master data management to ensure consistency and no redundancy, by extending the life of the legacy system, the intention is to reduce the total cost of ownership (TCO) while meeting additional needs for flexibility and functionality. However, the shorter duration of implementing and deploying a two-tier ERP model can actually lead to increased TCO if the indirect costs, such as training, hiring staff, and vendor support, are not taken into to account, as well.

The same problem will arise if we try to break PLM into components. With no solid data foundation, ability to bring and integrate various PLM components will be questionable. The integration cost will skyrocket. Compatibility between PLM components versions will make it even harder. Nevertheless, I can see growing business requirements, customers’ demand and shorter lifecycle for software products as something that will drive future PLM technological changes. Componentizing will be one of them.

What is my conclusion? To break large and heavy PLM suites into configurable and flexible components is an interesting opportunity to satisfy today’s dynamic business reality. However, two fundamental technologies are required to make it happen – scalable open data platform and reliable integration technologies. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


How cloud PLM can reuse on-premise enterprise data?

April 7, 2014

plm-on-premise-data-sync

Cloud becomes more and more an obsolete additional word to call every technology we develop I hardly can image anything these days that we develop without "cloud in mind". This is absolutely true about PLM. Nowadays, it is all about how to make cloud technologies to work for you and not against you.

For cloud PLM, the question of secure data usage is one of the most critical topics. Especially, if you think about your existing large enterprise customers. These large companies started PLM adoption many years ago and developed large data assets and custom applications. For them, data is one of the most important elements that can enable use of cloud PLMs.

Networkworld article How Boeing is using the cloud caught my attention this morning. The writeup quotes Boeing chief cloud strategies David Nelson and speaks about very interesting approach Boeing is using to deploy and use on-premise data on public cloud. Here is the passage that outline the approach:

Nelson first described an application the company has developed that tracks all of the flight paths that planes take around the world. Boeing’s sales staff uses it to help sell aircraft showing how a newer, faster one could improve operations. The app incorporates both historical and real-time data, which means there are some heavy workloads. “There’s lots of detail and analysis,” he says. It takes a “boatload” of processing power to collect the data, analyze it, render it and put it into a presentable fashion.

The application started years ago by running on five laptop computers that were synced together. They got so hot running the application that measures needed to be taken to keep them cool, Nelson said. Then Nelson helped migrate the application to the cloud, but doing so took approval from internal security, legal and technology teams.

In order to protect proprietary Boeing data the company uses a process called “shred and scatter.” Using software supported by a New Zealand firm, GreenButton, Boeing takes the data it plans to put in the cloud and breaks it up into the equivalent of what Nelson called puzzle pieces. Those pieces are then encrypted and sent to Microsoft Azure’s cloud. There it is stored and processed in the cloud, but for anything actionable to be gleaned from the data, it has to be reassembled behind Boeing’s firewall.

It made me think about one of the most critical things that will define future development and success of cloud PLM technologies and products – data connectivity and on-premise/cloud data sync. Here is my take on this challenge. It is easy to deploy and start using cloud PLM these days. However, PLM system without customer data is not very helpful. Yes, you can manage processes and new projects. However, let’s state the truth – you need to get access to legacy data to fully operate your PLM software on enterprise level. Manufacturing companies are very sensitive about their data assets. So to develop kind of "shred and scatter" data sync approaches can be an interesting path to unlock cloud PLM for large enterprise customers.

What is my conclusion? I can see cloud data sync as one of the most important cloud PLM challenges these days. To retrieve data from on-premise location in a meaningful way and bring it to the cloud in a secure manner is a show stopper to start broad large enterprise adoption. By solving this problem, cloud PLM vendors will open the gate for large enterprises to leverage public cloud. It is a challenge for top enterprise PLM vendors today and clearly entrance barrier for startup companies and newcomers in PLM world. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


CAD is half pregnant by cloud

April 1, 2014

cad-cloud-pregnant

The usage of cloud is growing every day. Started as an option to simplify collaboration and data exchange, it is proliferating into spaces such as backup, computation and many others. CAD and design are remaining one of the most conservative zone of the cloud and engineering software. Commonly agreed opinion – desktop is the best place to run CAD system in terms of resources, performance and tasks designers want to accomplish.

With such CAD desktop paradigm, you might think CAD users are completely independent from cloud. Actually, it is not so true. My attention caught by Cadalyst article – Advocate for Internet Access for CAD Tools by Robert Green. According to him CAD is no longer an island and significantly depends on cloud services and public internet infrastructure. Here is the passage, which explains that

Like it or not, our CAD users are becoming more and more dependent on tools that reside outside our company’s internal network. The types of systems we use may vary, but they typically include the following: FTP access sites for file uploading and downloading, Remote access of workstations for technical support; Remote log-on sessions to run compute-intensive tasks, such as rendering or analysis, on powerful remote workstations; Enterprise data management (EDM) and product data management (PDM) systems for CAD/BIM models and files; Cloud-based services on vendor-supplied servers. Whether you use one, several, or all of these Internet-based resources in your day-to-day CAD system, the fact remains that using CAD is no longer something that you alone can control. And when you must reach out over the Internet to complete your CAD tasks, IT becomes a crucial part of your workflow.

It made me think again about future of cloud and CAD relationships. In my view, cloud won’t be introduced to CAD users as a single lifetime event. Instead of switching designers and engineers to cloud CAD overnight, companies will introduce some cloud based services to maximize cloud value proposition to existing CAD-based workflows. You can navigate to some of my earlier posts – The future of CAD without files?; A moment before CAD files cloud mess…; What “end of local storage” means for CAD?; CAD, PLM and Future Cloud File Systems.

I can identify 3 main zones of existing CAD system enhancements that will leverage cloud eco-system to provide additional benefits to engineers:

1. Cloud based backup and file exchange. This is mainstream scenario that requires very little from CAD and other engineering software vendors. Cloud services such as Dropbox, Google Drive and some others can provide it today without even disrupting current workflows.

2. Viewing and collaboration. This is more complicated, but still very feasible scenario. Think about services such as GrabCAD Workbench, TeamPlatform and some others. These services can solve basic revision management needs and collaborative viewing of files.

3. Computation and special engineering design services. This is the most interesting case, in my view. In this scenario, desktop CAD systems will use services running from public cloud to solve simulation, analysis, and more complicated design tasks. Some of them can leverage elastic nature of cloud and some of them can be collaborative by allowing several engineers working together.

What is my conclusion? Can you be ‘half pregnant"? Actually, you can, if you think about CAD and cloud services. In my view, existing and new design tools will be leveraging hybrid resources (from desktop and cloud) to support optimal workflow and implement best user experience in the future. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 244 other followers